Tag Archives: Rent the musical

Could the scenario from ‘Rent’ really happen in Chicago?

The musical “Rent” was a seminal piece of theatre for me and a lot of my peers when we were in college in the 90’s. For many of us, it colored our perspective of landlord-tenant issues for years to come. The actual plot of the musical doesn’t really depend on the apartment issues – the characters could have the same conflicts and growth without the framing device of the rent scenario that gives the show its name. However, as a framing device to drive urgency and establish the setting, the choice to focus all of the action around a particular apartment building in New York serves as effective shorthand for establishing a villain and the low-income, counter-culture status of the main players.

Today I want to take a look at the various problems in the landlord-tenant relationship and living situation portrayed in “Rent” from a perspective of the Chicago market. Is there any way that this could come to pass in Chicago? How can it be avoided? What parts of the assorted conflicts do we take for granted as likely to occur in a renting situation, and how can a landlord structure their business to keep it from arising?

Before we get started, though, I want to see how far we’ve come since you started reading this blog. If you’re familiar with the plot of “Rent,” see how many potential problems you can identify if those people were renting in Chicago. If you’re unfamiliar with the show, I’ve included a video of the final Broadway cast performing the first 7 minutes, which should give you a good idea of what’s happening. Then come on back and we’ll go through them together.

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