Tag Archives: profit margins

Confronting our Agoraphobia, Part IV: The Active Shopper’s Guidebook

(This is the fourth and final part of a series that started with Part I: Carefully Taught, Part II: The Bad Guys are Winning, and Part III: The Long Road Back.)

Let’s Get Ready to Rumble! (Or at least have a polite chat.)

If you’ve been following the Agoraphobia series you may be ready to start shopping actively. However, if you’re the average American shopper you’re going to be pushing back against a lot of training and momentum trying to convince you that negotiation is difficult, scary, futile, or a waste of time.

It isn’t.

Negotiation is, at worst, a conversation with a stranger. But the American consumer has been treated for 150 years like a submissive partner in an abusive relationship. As is the case in many of these situations, learning to speak up for yourself can be difficult at first. So let’s assemble a guidebook to help you get started.

Level One Negotiation – learning to talk & think for yourself:

  • For level one, level two, and level three we’re talking only about goods, not services. This is about items that you can take home from the store with you.
  • From this point forward, every time you go to the store you will ask the clerks about the products you are purchasing. It doesn’t have to be about price. It can be about quality, color, country of origin… just get used to having the conversation. Get to know them. Be friendly and polite.
  • Never enter a shop without a shopping list. Never purchase anything that isn’t on the list. Never make the list less than 30 minutes before you enter the store.
  • I’ve got about 7 local grocers so I can go a bit overboard on this. I cap myself at 3 stores max when comparing grocery circulars.

    If you must pick something up that isn’t on your list, shop slowly. Carry it around with you in the store for at least half an hour before making the purchase.

  • Choose your favorite direct-to-vendor shopping site – Ebay, Etsy, or Craigslist. Find something you’ve been meaning to buy anyhow. Choose a handful of sellers and send them each some questions about the product you intend to purchase before you buy it.
  • Go to the farmer’s market closest to you and have a chat with the vendors. Ask at least 3 questions of a vendor before you buy something. And please, do buy something.
  • Pick up grocery circulars from the 3 closest shops. Figure out the least expensive combination of goods, and then compare with how much you’d pay by purchasing everything in your usual store. You don’t have to actually do the shopping in split locations. Just do the math. We’re practicing here. (PS, if you’re in Chicago and only shop at national chain grocers I am sad for you. Check out Tony’s, Food4less, Cermak Market, Harvestime, Morse Fresh Market, Mayfair Market Place, Butera and Stanley’s for some great alternatives.)

Once you’ve been at level one for at least 3 months, you’re ready to move on to level two.

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Confronting our Agoraphobia, Part III: The Long Road Back

(This is part 3 of a series that started with Confronting Agoraphobia, Part I: Carefully Taught and Confronting our Agoraphobia Part II: The Bad Guys are Winning.)

Where We’ve Been

Over the past two entries in this series we’ve reviewed how bargaining has gone from common to rare, and how shopping in America has become a passive experience. We’ve discussed how the evolution of marketing and discounting have consolidated the power of pricing entirely in the hands of the manufacturers. We’ve discussed the potential gain from choosing to haggle – a peak negotiator saved $2500 in a year. That means an average negotiator could save about $1500. What we haven’t discussed is how to work our way back to an even distribution of power.

Let me expand on that number a bit. $1500 saved per person, per year. 206 million adults in the United States, give or take a hundred thousand or so.[1] Roughly 10% of them are incarcerated.[2] If the rest of them saved $1500 per year, that would total $278.2 Billion saved. Annually. (That’s about 2x the annual revenue of Wal-Mart as reported to the NYSE,[3] or, sadly, just 1.7% of the national debt at this moment.[4])

Let’s have one more quote to get things moving forward:

“A recent Consumer Reports survey showed only 28 percent of Americans haggle over prices. A separate report from market research firm BIGresearch found 45.1 percent of adults haggle for things other than cars and homes.

However, the Consumer Reports survey found that consumers who haggle succeed as often as 83 percent of the time in landing a better bargain.”

— Yuki Noguchi, “Haggling picks up steam during recession,” NPR.org, August 2009.

 

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  1. [1]Wolfram alpha: What is the adult population of North America, July 2012.
  2. [2]NY Times: Adam Liptak, “1 in 100 U.S. Adults Behind Bars, New Study Says,” Feb 2008.
  3. [3]Ycharts: Wal-Mart Stores Revenue (WMT) as of July, 2012
  4. [4]US National Debt Clock, July 2012