Tag Archives: locks

Beyond the CRLTO: Other Chicago Rental Laws

In the Chicago rental housing market the CRLTO (Chicago Residential Landlord-Tenant Ordinance) gets all the glory when it comes to laws. More and more landlords and tenants are aware of it, and this is probably for the best as the penalties for violations are quite steep. However, there are other laws that also pertain to rental housing in Chicago that should not be ignored. Here are some that you may not know about. There are certainly more laws that apply, but these are some of the most crucial.

Artistic interpretation of the Chicago code of laws governing rentals

Federal Laws

Lead Based Paint Disclosure. The law requiring the disclosure of lead based paint hazards to anyone buying or renting a home has been on the books for twenty years. If a property was built before 1978 the landlord must tell the tenant about any lead-based paint hazards that they know of before renting it out. They also must provide a copy of the EPA’s “Protect Your Family From Lead In Your Home” pamphlet. Read more about the law.

State Laws (more…)

10 Steps to Secure Your Home or Apartment for Showings

So your landlord or an agent has called to say that she needs to show your home.

For owners this should come as no surprise. If your house is on the market, showings will happen and your agent will probably request that you absent yourself while they occur.

For renters, showings may be a surprise as they can happen at any time of year. You don’t have to be moving out. A showing in the middle of your lease does not necessarily mean that your apartment building is for sale! Your landlord may be trying to get a better insurance rate or refinance the property. Both of these tasks could require access to your apartment. You should grant it provided that your landlord gives you proper advance notice.

Regardless of who is coming to view your apartment, though, you can be certain of one thing – strangers will be entering your living quarters and you may not be able to be home when it happens. Whether it’s a new prospective renter, an appraiser or a Realtor, you’ll want to take precautions to make sure that you’ve safeguarded your belongings. After all, your landlord’s insurance won’t cover the items if they go missing or get damaged.

Google currently shows over 36 million results for the phrase “robbed during an open house.”

Here are ten things you can do to make sure your stuff stays safe when your home has an encounter with stranger danger.

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When your apartment is a crime scene

I don’t recommend reading this article while eating. We’re getting a little gross today.

Crimes and situations requiring the presence of the police unfortunately happen quite often in apartment buildings. As the density of people living together increases, so do the odds that one of them is doing something illegal. As we discussed on Monday, sometimes all the background checking in the world can’t clue you in to a tenant’s mental illness, deranged behavior or upcoming nervous breakdown.

We’ve spoken before about how landlords can prepare for worst case scenarios but we haven’t discussed what really happens when the first responders have to step in and take over. Unfortunately I’ve had to deal with many situations of this nature – I’ve dealt with stalkers, domestic violence, parking lot hit & runs, drug busts, marijuana gardens, suicides, gas leaks, hoarders, fires, break-ins and death from natural causes. (This would be one of the reasons I left property management in favor of brokerage.) If your apartment becomes a crime scene, here’s what to expect, what to do, and what to avoid.

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Tenant Hacks: How to background check your landlord

Magnifying glass looking at a house

Time to turn the tables.

Chicago Renters, I have to confess something – landlords these days hire as much for my skill in background checking as they do for my ability to market their apartments. Renters have this crazy reputation of being uniformly unemployed former sex offenders with bad credit who skipped out on their last lease. If you’re applying for an apartment chances are good that you will be subjected to a security check more thorough than those they apply to new police officers. I encourage this behavior – it helps to keep neighborhoods clean.

However, landlords have an equally unsavory reputation for being layabout shady shysters from foreign countries who are just a single late payment away from foreclosure and/or running off with your security deposit. It’s only fair that you should be able to do some background checking of your own, and fortunately a lot of the information is available free of charge.

When I’m representing renters I normally perform all of the following background checks as part of the service, but if you’re renting without representation in Chicago (or you’re working with an apartment locator instead of a real agent) you’ll have to do it yourself.

A quick disclaimer before we begin: this info pertains to Chicago renters only. Much of it works anywhere in Cook County, but if you’re renting elsewhere I’m afraid your situation is beyond my expertise. However, you’re welcome to try the techniques below and let me know if they successfully transferred to your state or city!

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Video Tutorials: How to change a lock

key entering lock cylinderWith the new Illinois lock change legislation effective January 1, 2012, many Chicago landlords are now required to change locks between each tenant and display proof of doing so to the new tenant. If they do not do so, they become liable for any losses incurred by their new tenants if the loss occurs due to someone having an old copy of the key.

Meanwhile, many small private landlords will allow tenants to change their own locks so long as the landlord gets copies of the keys. (Tenants, check your lease first before changing locks, and if the lease says nothing, ASK YOUR LANDLORD FIRST.)

As for homeowners, changing the locks after you buy a new home should happen before you put any of your personal belongings into the property.  Think about how many people might have copies of an old housekey – relatives, housekeepers, babysitters, maintenance folk – do you want them having access once the property changes hands?

There’s two versions of lock changes – one is voluntary, when you have access to both sides of the door. The other is involuntary, where you only have access from the outside. Involuntary lock changes could be required if, for example, a tenant moves out without returning keys to their landlord, or a homeowner completely locks him or herself out of their own home.

Let’s start with a basic, voluntary replacement of a deadbolt and doorknob.

And here’s an involuntary one. Landlords, don’t do this unless you’re absolutely sure that your tenant is no longer living in the property, or they have asked you to do it. However, do take note of the methods used by this guy for documenting the lock change process. (more…)